Building a timer...

DIY timing systems
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SlartyBartFast
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Building a timer...

Post by SlartyBartFast » Thu Jan 22, 2009 11:42 pm

Well, even though overworked, tired, stressed out, and still a couple of years until I even have child in Cubs, I spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about all things KubKar(Derby).

Anyone familiar with my posts knows I enjoy looking up tech stuff and getting my elbows in deep enough to figure out that I don't really have a clue as to what I'm dealing with.

But in the vein of making it a DIY project, I always had my eye on the timer kits at: http://derbytimer.com/order.php

But, they seem to be on eternal backorder.

Yesterday I stumbled across this little beauty:
http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/produc ... ts_id=8971

With a 32bit processor and 78 I/O pins, that little monster could probably run the derby timer software and much more. Start by prototyping with the development board and a breadboard, then make a pcb into which the development board plugs...



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gpraceman
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Re: Building a timer...

Post by gpraceman » Fri Jan 23, 2009 9:35 am

SlartyBartFast wrote:But in the vein of making it a DIY project, I always had my eye on the timer kits at: http://derbytimer.com/order.php

But, they seem to be on eternal backorder.
Bert Drake seems to have dropped off the face of the Earth about 1-1/2 years ago.
SlartyBartFast wrote:Well, even though overworked, tired, stressed out, and still a couple of years until I even have child in Cubs, I spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about all things KubKar(Derby).
If you want to be able to build something quickly and for not too much money, you might want to consider the Fast Track K1 "Cheap Kit". You solder the components together and then build an enclosure to house the electronics. For $60 you get a good quality timer with a computer interface and don't have to worry about circuit design, layout and trying to find the right components. For $20 more, they will do all of the soldering for you. It is a 4 lane timer, but you could easily use it on a track with fewer lanes.

http://www.microwizard.com/k1page.html


Randy Lisano
Romans 5:8

Awana Grand Prix and Pinewood Derby racing - Where a child, an adult and a small block of wood combine for a lot of fun and memories.

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SlartyBartFast
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Re: Building a timer...

Post by SlartyBartFast » Mon Jan 26, 2009 11:20 am

Maybe someone should try and contact Bert directly. :p

http://www.whois.net/whois_new.cgi?d=derbytimer&tld=com

Scary the info one can get on the net.

Actually, I want to play with the software myself. So the development board is looking VERY tempting.



reddriver
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Re: Building a timer...

Post by reddriver » Wed Jan 28, 2009 9:12 pm

Could the microwizard kit be made to time one lane in four different spots? I would like to get incremental times on a test track.



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gpraceman
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Re: Building a timer...

Post by gpraceman » Wed Jan 28, 2009 9:19 pm

reddriver wrote:Could the microwizard kit be made to time one lane in four different spots? I would like to get incremental times on a test track.
Certainly.

The NewBold DTx000 timers would work well for that as well, since the sensors are not mounted into some frame or circuit board.


Randy Lisano
Romans 5:8

Awana Grand Prix and Pinewood Derby racing - Where a child, an adult and a small block of wood combine for a lot of fun and memories.


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